Warning !

Soas is no longer maintained. You are strongly encouraged to switch to its successor, QSoas

Preamble

The routines described in this section use the public domain ORDPACK package available on the NETLIB repository (http://www.netlib.org). If you want to know how it works, the documentation is here: http://www.netlib.org/odrpack/guide.ps or http://bip.cnrs-mrs.fr/bip06/soas/odrpack_manual.pdf

The following introduction to non linear fitting is taken from the help file of Gnuplot (http://www.gnuplot.info/):

`fit` is used to find a set of parameters to be used in a parametric function to make it fit to your data optimally. The quantity to be minimized is the sum of squared differences between your input data points and the function values at the same places, usually called 'chisquared' (i.e. the Greek letter chi, to the power of 2). (...)

Now that you know why it's called 'least squares fitting', let's see why it's 'nonlinear'. That's because the function's dependence on the parameters (not the data!) may be non-linear. Of course, this might not tell you much if you didn't know already, so let me try to describe it. If the fitting problem were to be linear, the target function would have to be a sum of simple, non-parametric functions, each multiplied by one parameter. (For example, consider the function f(x) = c*sin(x), where we want to find the best value for the constant c. This is nonlinear in x, of course, but it is linear in c. Since the fitting procedure solves for c, it has a linear equation to solve.) For such a linear case, the task of fitting can be performed by comparatively simple linear algebra in one direct step. But `fit` can do more for you: the parameters may be used in your function in any way you can imagine. To handle this more general case, however, it has to perform an iteration, i.e. it will repeat a sequence of steps until it finds the fit to have 'converged' (...).

Generally, the function to be fitted will come from some kind of theory (some prefer the term 'model' here) that makes a prediction about how the data should behave, and `fit` is then used to find the free parameters of the theory. This is a typical task in scientific work, where you have lots of data that depend in more or less complicated ways on the values you're interested in. The results will then usually be of the form 'the measured data can be described by the foo theory, for the following set of parameters', and then a set of values is given, together with the errors of your determination of these values.

This reasoning implies that `fit` is probably not your tool of choice if all you really want is a smooth line through your data points. If you want this, the [`reg` command] is what you've been looking for, not `fit`.

Warning !

Soas is no longer maintained. You are strongly encouraged to switch to its successor, QSoas
Christophe Leger 2009-02-24